Debezium Blog

The temperatures are slowly cooling off after the biggest summer heat, an the Debezium community is happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.10.0.Beta4. In this release we’re happy to share some news we don’t get to share too often: with Apache Cassandra, another database gets added to the list of databases supported by Debezium!

In addition, we finished our efforts for rebasing the existing Postgres connector to Debezium framework structure established for the SQL Server and Oracle connectors. This means more shared coded between these connectors, and in turn reduced maintenance efforts for the development team going forward; but there’s one immediately tangible advantage for you coming with this, too: the Postgres connector now exposes the same metrics you already know from the other connectors.

Finally, the new release contains a range of bugfixes and other useful improvements. Let’s explore some details below.

The summer is at its peak but Debezium community is not relenting in its effort so the Debezium 0.10.0.Beta3 is released.

This version not only continues in incremental improvements of Debezium but also brings new shiny features.

All of you who are using PostgreSQL 10 and higher as a service offered by different cloud providers definitely felt the complications when you needed to deploy logical decoding plugin necessary to enable streaming. This is no longer necessary. Debezium now supports (DBZ-766) pgoutput replication protocol that is available out-of-the-box since PostgreSQL 10.

Debezium has received a huge improvement to the structure of its container images recently, making it extremely simple to extend its behaviour.

This is a small tutorial showing how you can for instance add Sentry, "an open-source error tracking [software] that helps developers monitor and fix crashes in real time". Here we’ll use it to collect and report any exceptions from Kafka Connect and its connectors. Note that this is only applicable for Debezium 0.9+.

We need a few things to have Sentry working, and we’ll add all of them and later have a Dockerfile which gets it all glued correctly:

  • Configure Log4j

  • SSL certificate for sentry.io, since it’s not by default in the JVM trusted chain

  • The sentry and sentry-log4j libraries

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.10.0.Beta2!

This further stabilizes the 0.10 release line, with lots of bug fixes to the different connectors. 23 issues were fixed for this release; a couple of those relate to the DDL parser of the MySQL connector, e.g. around RENAME INDEX (DBZ-1329), SET NEW in triggers (DBZ-1331) and function definitions with the COLLATE keyword (DBZ-1332).

For the Postgres connector we fixed a potential inconsistency when flushing processed LSNs to the database (DBZ-1347). Also the "include.unknown.datatypes" option works as expected now during snapshotting (DBZ-1335) and the connector won’t stumple upon materialized views during snapshotting any longer (DBZ-1345).

Another week, another Debezium release — I’m happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.10.0.Beta1!

Besides the upgrade to Apache Kafka 2.2.1 (DBZ-1316), this mostly fixes some bugs, including a regression to the MongoDB connector introduced in the Alpha2 release (DBZ-1317).

A very welcomed usability improvement is that the connectors will log a warning now if not at least one table is actually captured as per the whitelist/blacklist configuration (DBZ-1242). This helps to prevent the accidental exclusion all tables by means of an incorrect filter expression, in which case the connectors "work as intended", but no events are propagated to the message broker.

Please see the release notes for the complete list of issues fixed in this release. Also make sure to examine the upgrade guidelines for 0.10.0.Alpha1 and Alpha2 when upgrading from earlier versions.

Many thanks to community members Cheng Pan and Ching Tsai for their contributions to this release!

Release early, release often — Less than a week since the Alpha1 we are announcing the release of Debezium 0.10.0.Alpha2!

This is an incremental release that completes some of the tasks started in the Alpha1 release and provides a few bugfixes and also quality improvements in our Docker images.

The change in the logic of the snapshot field has been delivered (DBZ-1295) as outlined in the last announcement. All connectors now provide information which of the records is the last one in the snapshot phase so that downstream consumers can react to this.

I’m very happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.10.0.Alpha1!

The major theme for Debezium 0.10 will be to do some clean-up (that’s what you do at this time of the year, right?); we’ve planned to remove a few deprecated features and to streamline some details in the structure the CDC events produced by the different Debezium connectors.

This means that upgrading to Debezium 0.10 from earlier versions might take a bit more planning and consideration compared to earlier upgrades, depending on your usage of features and options already marked as deprecated in 0.9 and before. But no worries, we’re describing all changes in great detail in this blog post and the release notes.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.5.Final!

This is a recommended update for all users of earlier versions; besides bug fixes also a few new features are provide. The release contains 18 resolved issues overall.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.4.Final!

This is a drop-in replacement for earlier Debezium 0.9.x versions, containing mostly bug fixes and some improvements related to metrics. Overall, 17 issues were resolved.

The Debezium team is happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.3.Final!

This is mostly a bug-fix release and a drop-in replacement for earlier Debezium 0.9.x versions, but there are few significant new features too. Overall, 17 issues were resolved.

Note
Container images will be released with a small delay due to some Docker Hub configuration issues.

The Debezium team is happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.2.Final!

This is mostly a bug-fix release and a drop-in replacement for earlier Debezium 0.9.x versions. Overall, 18 issues were resolved.

A couple of fixes relate to the Debezium Postgres connector:

Quickly following up to last week’s release of Debezium 0.9, it’s my pleasure today to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.1.Final!

This release fixes a couple of bugs which were reported after the 0.9 release. Most importantly, there are two fixes to the new Debezium connector for SQL Server, which deal with correct handling of LSNs after connector restarts (DBZ-1128, DBZ-1131). The connector also uses more reasonable defaults for the selectMethod and fetchSize options of the SQL Server JDBC driver (DBZ-1065), which can help to significantly increase through-put and reduce memory consumption of the connector.

The MySQL connector supports GENERATED columns now with the new Antlr-based DDL parser (DBZ-1123), and for the Postgres connector the handling of primary key column definition changes was improved (DBZ-997).

I’m delighted to announce the release of Debezium 0.9 Final!

This release only adds a small number of changes since last week’s CR1 release; most prominently there’s some more metrics for the SQL Server connector (lag behind master, number of transactions etc.) and two bug fixes related to the handling of partitioned tables in MySQL (DBZ-1113) and Postgres (DBZ-1118).

Having been in the works for six months after the initial Alpha release, Debezium 0.9 comes with a brand new connector for SQL Server, lots of new features and improvements for the existing connectors, updates to the latest versions of Apache Kafka and the supported databases as well as a wide range of bug fixes.

Reaching the home stretch towards Debezium 0.9, it’s with great pleasure that I’m announcing the first release of Debezium in 2019, 0.9.0.CR1!

For this release we’ve mainly focused on sorting out remaining issues in the Debezium connector for SQL Server; the connector comes with greatly improved performance and has received a fair number of bug fixes.

Other changes include a new interface for event handlers of Debezium’s embedded engine, which allows for bulk handling of change events, an option to export the scale of numeric columns as schema parameter, as well as a wide range of bug fixes for the Debezium connectors for MySQL, Postgres and Oracle.

With only a few days left for the year, it’s about time for another Debezium release; so it’s with great pleasure that I’m announcing Debezium 0.9.0.Beta2!

This release comes with support for MySQL 8 and Oracle 11g; it includes a first cut of metrics for monitoring the SQL Server and Oracle connectors, several improvements to the MongoDB event flattening SMT as well as a wide range of bug fixes. Overall, not less than 42 issues were addressed; very clearly, there has to be some deeper sense in that ;)

A big shout out goes to the following members Debezium’s amazing community, who contributed to this release: Eero Koplimets, Grzegorz Kołakowski, Hanlin Liu, Lao Mei, Renato Mefi, Tautvydas Januskevicius, Wout Scheepers and Zheng Wang!

In the following, let’s take a closer look at some of the changes coming with the 0.9 Beta2 release.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.0.Beta1! Oh, and to those of you who are celebrating it — Happy Thanksgiving!

This new Debezium release comes with several great improvements to our work-in-progress SQL Server connector:

  • Initial snapshots can be done using the snapshot isolation level if enabled in the DB (DBZ-941)

  • Changes to the structures of captured tables after the connector has been set up are supported now (DBZ-812)

  • New connector option decimal.handling.mode (DBZ-953) and pass-through of any database.* option to the JDBC driver (DBZ-964)

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.0.Alpha2!

While the work on the connectors for SQL Server and Oracle continues, we decided to do another Alpha release, as lots of fixes and new features - many of them contributed by community members - have piled up, which we wanted to get into your hands as quickly as possible.

This release supports Apache Kafka 2.0, comes with support for Postgres' HSTORE column type, allows to rename and filter fields from change data messages for MongoDB and contains multiple bug fixes and performance improvements. Overall, this release contains 55 fixes (note that a few of these have been merged back to 0.8.x and are contained in earlier 0.8 releases, too).

A big "Thank You" is in order to community members Andrey Pustovetov, Artiship Artiship, Cliff Wheadon, Deepak Barr, Ian Axelrod, Liu Hanlin, Maciej Bryński, Ori Popowski, Peng Lyu, Philip Sanetra, Sagar Rao and Syed Muhammad Sufyian for their contributions to this release. We salute you!

As temperatures are cooling off, the Debezium team is getting into full swing again and we’re happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.8.3.Final!

This is a bugfix release to the current stable release line of Debezium, 0.8.x, while the work on Debezium 0.9 goes on in parallel. There are 14 fixes in this release. As in earlier 0.8.x releases, we’ve further improved the new Antlr-based DDL parser used by the MySQL connector (see DBZ-901, DBZ-903 and DBZ-910).

The Postgres connector saw a huge improvement to its start-up time for databases with lots of custom types (DBZ-899). The user reporting this issue had nearly 200K entries in pg_catalog.pg_type, and due to an N + 1 SELECT issue within the Postgres driver itself, this caused the connector to take 24 minutes to start. By using a custom query for obtaining the type metadata, we were able to cut down this time to 5 seconds! Right now we’re working with the maintainers of the Postgres driver to get this issue fixed upstream, too.

The Debezium team is back from summer holidays and we’re happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.8.2!

This is a bugfix release to the current stable release line of Debezium, 0.8.x, while the work on Debezium 0.9 is continuing.

Note: By accident the version of the release artifacts is 0.8.2 instead of 0.8.2.Final. This is not in line with our recently established convention of always letting release versions end with qualifiers such as Alpha1, Beta1, CR1 or Final. The next version in the 0.8 line will be 0.8.3.Final and we’ll improve our release pipeline to make sure that this situation doesn’t occur again.

The 0.8.2 release contains 10 fixes overall, most of them dealing with issues related to DDL parsing as done by the Debezium MySQL connector. For instance, implicit non-nullable primary key columns will be handled correctly now using the new Antlr-based DDL parser (DBZ-860). Also the MongoDB connector saw a bug fix (DBZ-838): initial snapshots will be interrupted now if the connector is requested to stop (e.g. when shutting down Kafka Connect). More a useful improvement rather than a bug fix is the Postgres connector’s capability to add the table, schema and database names to the source block of emitted CDC events (DBZ-866).

Thanks a lot to community members Andrey Pustovetov, Cliff Wheadon and Ori Popowski for their contributions to this release!

Just two weeks after the Debezium 0.8 release, I’m very happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.9.0.Alpha1!

The main feature of the new version is a first work-in-progress version of the long-awaited Debezium connector for MS SQL Server. Based on the CDC functionality available in the Enterprise and Standard editions, the new connector lets you stream data changes out of Microsoft’s popular RDBMS.

Besides that we’ve continued the work on the Debezium Oracle connector. Most notably, it supports initial snapshots of captured tables now. We’ve also upgraded Apache Kafka in our Docker images to 1.1.1 (DBZ-829).

Please take a look at the change log for the complete list of changes in 0.9.0.Alpha1 and general upgrade notes.

Note: At the time of writing (2018-07-26), the release artifacts (connector archives) are available on Maven Central. We’ll upload the Docker images for 0.9.0.Alpha1 to Docker Hub as soon as possible. The Docker images are already uplodaded and ready for use under tags 0.9.0.Alpha1 and rolling 0.9.

I’m very happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.8.0.Final!

The key features of Debezium 0.8 are the first work-in-progress version of our Oracle connector (based on the XStream API) and a brand-new parser for MySQL DDL statements. Besides that, there are plenty of smaller new features (e.g. propagation of default values to corresponding Connect schemas, optional propagation of source queries in CDC messages and a largely improved SMT for sinking changes from MongoDB into RDBMS) as well as lots of bug fixes (e.g. around temporal and numeric column types, large transactions with Postgres).

Please see the previous announcements (Beta 1, CR 1) to learn about all the changes in more depth. The Final release largely resembles CR1; apart from further improvements to the Oracle connector (DBZ-792) there’s one nice addition to the MySQL connector contributed by Peter Goransson: when doing a snapshot, it will now expose information about the processed rows via JMX (DBZ-789), which is very handy when snapshotting larger tables.

Please take a look at the change log for the complete list of changes in 0.8.0.Final and general upgrade notes.

A fantastic Independence Day to all the Debezium users in the U.S.! But that’s not the only reason to celebrate: it’s also with great happiness that I’m announcing the release of Debezium 0.8.0.CR1!

Following our new release scheme, the focus for this candidate release of Debezium 0.8 has been to fix bug reported for last week’s Beta release, accompanied by a small number of newly implemented features.

Thanks a lot to everyone testing the new Antlr-based DDL parser for the MySQL connector; based on the issues you reported, we were able to fix a few bugs in it. As announced recently, for 0.8 the legacy parser will remain the default implementation, but you are strongly encouraged to test out the new one (by setting the connector option ddl.parser.mode to antlr) and report any findings you may have. We’ve planned to switch to the new implementation by default in Debezium 0.9.

It’s with great excitement that I’m announcing the release of Debezium 0.8.0.Beta1!

This release brings many exciting new features as well as bug fixes, e.g. the first drop of our new Oracle connector, a brand new DDL parser for the MySQL connector, support for MySQL default values and the update to Apache Kafka 1.1.

Due to the big number of changes (the release contains exactly 42 issues overall), we decided to alter our versioning schema a little bit: going forward we may do one or more Beta and CR ("candidate release") releases before doing a final one. This will allow us to get feedback from the community early on, while still completing and polishing specific features. Final (stable) releases will be named like 0.8.0.Final etc.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.7.5!

This is a bugfix release to the 0.7 release line, which we decided to do while working towards Debezium 0.8. Most notably it fixes an unfortunate bug introduced in 0.7.3 (DBZ-663), where the internal database history topic of the Debezium MySQL connector could be partly deleted under some specific conditions. Please see the dedicated blog post on this issue to find out whether this affects you and what you should do to prevent this issue.

Together with this, we released a couple of other fixes and improvements. Thanks to Maciej Brynski, the performance of the logical table routing SMT has been improved significantly (DBZ-655). Another fix contributed by Maciej is for DBZ-646 which lets the MySQL connector handle CREATE TABLE statements for the TokuDB storage engine now.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.7.4!

Continuing the 0.7 release line, this new version brings several bug fixes and a handful of new features. We recommend this upgrade to all users. When upgrading from earlier versions, please check out the release notes of all versions between the one you’re currently on and 0.7.4 in order to learn about any steps potentially required for upgrading.

I’m very happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.7.3!

This is primarily a bugfix release, but we’ve also added a handful of smaller new features. It’s a recommended upgrade for all users. When upgrading from earlier versions, please check out the release notes of all versions between the one your’re currently on and 0.7.3 in order to learn about any steps potentially required for upgrading.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the new features.

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.7.2!

Amongst the new features there’s support for geo-spatial types, a new snapshotting mode for recovering a lost DB history topic for the MySQL connector, and a message transformation for converting MongoDB change events into a structure which can be consumed by many more sink connectors. And of course we fixed a whole lot of bugs, too.

Debezium 0.7.2 is a drop-in replacement for previous 0.7.x versions. When upgrading from versions earlier than 0.7.0, please check out the release notes of all 0.7.x releases to learn about any steps potentially required for upgrading.

A big thank you goes out to our fantastic community members for their hard work on this release: Andrey Pustovetov, Denis Mikhaylov, Peter Goransson, Robert Coup, Sairam Polavarapu and Tom Bentley.

Now let’s take a closer look at some of new features.

Just last few days before Christmas we are releasing Debezium 0.7.1! This is a bugfix release that fixes few annoying issues that were found during first rounds of use of Debezium 0.7 by our community. All issues relate to either newly provided wal2json support or reduced risk of internal race condition improvement.

Robert Coup has found a performance regression in situations when 0.7.0 was used with old version of Protobuf decoder.

Suraj Savita (and others) has found an issue when our code failed to correctly detect it runs with Amazon RDS wal2json plug-in. We are outsmarted by the JDBC driver internals and included a distinct plugin decoder name wal2json_rds that bypasses detection routine and by default expects it runs against Amazon RDS instance. This mode should be used only with RDS instances.

We have also gathered feedback from first tries to run with Amazon RDS and included a short section in our documentation on this topic.

It’s not Christmas yet, but we already got a present for you: Debezium 0.7.0 is here, full of new features as well as many bug fixes! A big thank you goes out to all the community members who contributed to this release. It is very encouraging for us to see not only more and more issues and feature requests being reported, but also pull requests coming in.

Note that this release comes with a small number of changes to the default mappings for some data types. We try to avoid this sort of changes as far as possible, but in some cases it is required, e.g. if the previous mapping could have caused potential value losses. Please see below for the details and also make sure to check out the full change log which describes these changes in detail.

Now let’s take a closer look at some of new features.

We are accelerating! Three weeks after the 0.6.1 release, the Debezium team is bringing Debezium 0.6.2 to you!

This release revolves mostly around bug fixes, but there are a few new features, too. Let’s take a closer look at some of the changes.

Just shy of a month after the 0.6.0 release, I’m happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.6.1!

This release contains several bugfixes, dependency upgrades and a new option for controlling how BIGINT UNSIGNED columns are conveyed. We also expanded the set of Docker images and Docker Compose files accompanying our tutorial, so you can run it now with all the databases we support.

Let’s take a closer look at some of the changes.

What’s better than getting Java 9? Getting Java 9 and a new version of Debezium at the same time! So it’s with great happiness that I’m announcing the release of Debezium 0.6 today.

I’m very happy to announce the release of Debezium 0.5.2!

As the previous release, the 0.5.2 release fixes several bugs in the MySQL, Postgres and MongoDB connectors. But there are also several new features and options:

  • The decimal.handling.mode option already known from the MySQL connector is now also supported for PostgreSQL (DBZ-337). It lets you control how NUMERIC and DECIMAL columns are represented in change events (either using Kafka’s Decimal type or as double).

  • The MongoDB connector supports the options database.whitelist and database.blacklist now (DBZ-302)

  • The PostgreSQL connector can deal with array-typed columns as well as with quoted identifiers for tables, schemas etc. (DBZ-297, DBZ-298)

  • The Debezium Docker images run on Red Hat’s OpenShift cloud environment (DBZ-267)

It’s my pleasure to announce the release of Debezium 0.5.1!

This release fixes several bugs in the MySQL, Postgres and MongoDB connectors. There’s also support for some new datatypes: POINT on MySQL (DBZ-222) and TSTZRANGE on Postgres (DBZ-280). This release is a drop-in replacement for 0.5.0, upgrading is recommended to all users.

Note that in the — rather unlikely — case that you happened to enable Debezium for all the system tables of MySQL, any configured table filters will be applied to these system tables now, too (DBZ-242). This may require an adjustment of your filters if you indeed wanted to capture all system tables but only selected non-system tables.

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.5.0 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.2.0. This release also includes a few fixes for the MySQL connector. See the release notes for specifics on these changes, and be sure to check out the Kafka documentation for compatibility with the version of the Kafka broker that you are using.

Kafka Connect 0.10.2.0 comes with a significant new feature called Single Message Transforms, and you can now use them with Debezium connectors. SMTs allow you to modify the messages produced by Debezium connectors and any oher Kafka Connect source connectors, before those messages are written to Kafka. SMTs can also be used with Kafka Connect sink connectors to modify the messages before the sink connectors processes them. You can use SMTs to filter out or mask specific fields, add new fields, modify existing fields, change the topic and/or topic partition to which the messages are written, and even more. And you can even chain multiple SMTs together.

Kafka Connect comes with a number of built-in SMTs that you can simply configure and use, but you can also create your own SMT implementations to do more complex and interesting things. For example, although Debezium connectors normally map all of the changes in each table (or collection) to separate topics, you can write a custom SMT that uses a completely different mapping between tables and topics and even add fields to message keys and/or values. Using your new SMT is also very easy - simply put it on the Kafka Connect classpath and update the connector configuration to use it.

We’ve also added Debezium Docker images labelled 0.5 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Sanjay and everyone in the community for their help with this release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.4.1 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.1.1. This release includes several fixes for the MongoDB connector and MySQL connector, including improved support for Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora (MySQL compatibility). See the release notes for specifics on these changes.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.4 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Jan, Horia, David, Josh, Johan, Sanjay, Saulius, and everyone in the community for their help with this release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

With the recent Debezium release, we’re happy to announce that a new PostgreSQL connector has been added alongside the already existing MySQL and MongoDB connectors.

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.4.0 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.1.1. This release introduces a new PostgreSQL connector, and contains over a dozen fixes combined for the MongoDB connector and MySQL connector, including preliminar support for Amazon RDS and Amazon Aurora (MySQL compatibility). See the release notes for specifics on these changes.

We’ve also created Debezium Docker images labelled 0.4 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Horia, Chris, Akshath, Ramesh, Matthias, Anton, Sagi, barton, and others for their help with this release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.6 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains over a dozen fixes combined for the MySQL connector and MongoDB connectors. See the release notes for specifics on these changes.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Farid, RenZhu, Dongjun, Anton, Chris, Dennis, Sharaf, Rodrigo, Tim, and others for their help with this release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.5 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains several fixes for the MySQL connector and adds the ability to use with multi-master MySQL servers as sources. See the release notes for specifics on these changes. We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

One of the fixes is signficant, and so we strongly urge all users to upgrade to this release from all earlier versions. In prior versions, the MySQL connector may stop without completing all updates in a transaction, and when the connector restarts it starts with the next transaction and therefore might fail to capture some of the change events in the earlier transaction. This release fixes this issue so that when restarting it will always pick up where it left off, even if that point is in the middle of a transaction. Note that this fix only takes affect once a connector is upgraded and restarted. See the issue for more details.

Thanks to Akshath, Anton, Chris, and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.4 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains several new features for the MySQL connector: support for MySQL’s JSON datatype, a new snapshot mode called schema_only, and JMX metrics. Also, the Debezium Docker images for Zookeeper, Kafka, and Kafka Connect have all been updated to allow optionally expose JMX metrics in these services. And, one backward-incompatible fix was made to the change event’s ts_sec field. See the release notes for specifics.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Akshath, Chris, Vitalii, Dennis, Prannoy, and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.3 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains a handful of bug fixes and minor improvements for the MySQL connector, including better handling of BIT(n) values, ENUM and SET values, and GTID sets, This release also improves the log messages output by the MySQL connectors to better represent the ongoing activity when consuming the changes from the source database. See the release notes for specifics.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial. We’ve also updated the tutorial to use the latest Docker installations on Linux, Windows, and OS X.

Thanks to Akshath, Chris, Randy, Prannoy, Umang, Horia, and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.2 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains a handful of bug fixes and minor improvements for the MySQL connector and MongoDB connector. The MySQL connector better handles BIT(n) values and zero-value date and timestamp values. This release also improves the log messages output by the MySQL and MongoDB connectors to better represent the ongoing activity when consuming the changes from the source database. See the release notes for specifics.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial. We’ve also updated the tutorial to use the latest Docker installations on Linux, Windows, and OS X.

Thanks to Akshath, Colum, Emmanuel, Konstantin, Randy, RenZhu, Umang, and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

We’re happy to announce that Debezium 0.3.1 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains an updated MySQL connector with a handful of bug fixes and two significant but backward-compatible changes. First, the MySQL connector now supports using secure connections to MySQL, adding to the existing ability to connect securely to Kafka. Second, the MySQL connector is able to capture MySQL string values using the proper character sets so that any values stored in the database can be captured correctly in events. See our release notes for details of these changes and for upgrading recommendations.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images labelled 0.3 and latest, which we use in our tutorial.

Thanks to Chris, Akshath, barten, and and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

After a few weeks delay, Debezium 0.3.0 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1. This release contains an updated MySQL connector with quite a few bug fixes, and a new MongoDB connector that captures the changes made to a MongoDB replica set or MongoDB sharded cluster. See the documentation for details about how to configure these connectors and how they work.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images (with labels 0.3 and latest) used in our tutorial.

Thanks to Andrew, Bhupinder, Chris, David, Horia, Konstantin, Tony, and others for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions!

I’m happy to announce that Debezium 0.2.4 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.9.0.1. This release adds more verbose logging during MySQL snapshots, enables taking snapshots of very large MySQL databases, and correct a potential exception during graceful shutdown. See our release notes for details of these changes and for upgrading recommendations.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images (with label 0.2 and latest) used in our tutorial.

Thanks to David and wangshao for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions! Stay tuned for our next release, which will be 0.3 and will have a new MongoDB connector and will support Kafka Connect 0.10.0.1.

I’m happy to announce that Debezium 0.2.3 is now available for use with Kafka Connect 0.9.0.1. This release corrects the MySQL connector behavior when working with TINYINT and SMALLINT columns or with TIME, DATE, and TIMESTAMP columns. See our release notes for details of these changes and for upgrading recommendations.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images (with label 0.2 and latest) used in our tutorial.

Thanks to Chris, Christian, Laogang, and Tony for their help with the release, issues, discussions, contributions, and questions! Stay tuned for our next release, which will be 0.3 and will have a new MongoDB connector and will support Kafka Connect 0.10.0.0.

I’m happy to announce that Debezium 0.2.2 is now available. This release fixes several bugs in the MySQL connector that can produce change events with incorrect source metadata, and that eliminates the possibility a poorly-timed connector crash causing the connector to only process some of the rows in a multi-row MySQL event. See our release notes for details of these changes and for upgrading recommendations.

Also, thanks to a community member for reporting that Debezium 0.2.x can only be used with Kafka Connect 0.9.0.1. Debezium 0.2.x cannot be used with Kafka Connect 0.10.0.0 because of its backward incompatible changes to the consumer API. Our next release of Debezium will support Kafka 0.10.x.

We’ve also updated the Debezium Docker images (with label 0.2 and latest) used in our tutorial.

I’m happy to announce that Debezium 0.2.1 is now available. The MySQL connector has been significantly improved and is now able to monitor and produce change events for HA MySQL clusters using GTIDs, perform a consistent snapshot when starting up the first time, and has a completely redesigned event message structure that provides a ton more information with every event. Our change log has all the details about bugs, enhancements, new features, and backward compatibility notices. We’ve also updated our tutorial.

Update (Oct. 11 2019): An alternative, and much simpler, approach for running Debezium (and Apache Kafka and Kafka Connect in general) on Kubernetes is to use a K8s operator such as Strimzi. You can find instructions for the set-up of Debezium on OpenShift here, and similar steps apply for plain Kubernetes.

Our Debezium Tutorial walks you step by step through using Debezium by installing, starting, and linking together all of the Docker containers running on a single host machine. Of course, you can use things like Docker Compose or your own scripts to make this easier, although that would just automating running all the containers on a single machine. What you really want is to run the containers on a cluster of machines. In this blog, we’ll run Debezium using a container cluster manager from Red Hat and Google called Kubernetes.

Kubernetes is a container (Docker/Rocket/Hyper.sh) cluster management tool. Like many other popular cluster management and compute resource scheduling platforms, Kubernetes' roots are in Google, who is no stranger to running containers at scale. They start, stop, and cluster 2 billion containers per week and they contributed a lot of the Linux kernel underpinnings that make containers possible. One of their famous papers talks about an internal cluster manager named Borg. With Kubernetes, Google got tired of everyone implementing their papers in Java so they decided to implement this one themselves :)

Kubernetes is written in Go-lang and is quickly becoming the de-facto API for scheduling, managing, and clustering containers at scale. This blog isn’t intended to be a primer on Kubernetes, so we recommend heading over to the Getting Started docs to learn more about Kubernetes.

Debezium is a distributed platform that turns your existing databases into event streams, so applications can see and respond almost instantly to each committed row-level change in the databases. Debezium is built on top of Kafka and provides Kafka Connect compatible connectors that monitor specific database management systems. Debezium records the history of data changes in Kafka logs, so your application can be stopped and restarted at any time and can easily consume all of the events it missed while it was not running, ensuring that all events are processed correctly and completely. Debezium is open source under the Apache License, Version 2.0.

Now the good news — Debezium 0.1 is now available and includes several significant features:

  • A connector for MySQL to monitor MySQL databases. It’s a Kafka Connect source connector, so simply install it into a Kafka Connect service (see below) and use the service’s REST API to configure and manage connectors to each DBMS server. The connector reads the MySQL binlog and generates data change events for every committed row-level modification in the monitored databases. The MySQL connector generates events based upon the tables' structure at the time the row is changed, and it automatically handles changes to the table structures.

  • A small library so applications can embed any Kafka Connect connector and consume data change events read directly from the source system. This provides a much lighter weight system (since Zookeeper, Kafka, and Kafka Connect services are not needed), but as a consequence is not as fault tolerant or reliable since the application must maintain state normally kept inside Kafka’s distributed and replicated logs. Thus the application becomes completely responsible for managing all state.